The Owl’s Nest Responds to Heroin Epidemic in the Southeast

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For many heroin users, the journey to addiction begins with a simple painkiller prescription from their doctor. Narcotic medications, including oxycodone, morphine, hydrocodone, and fentanyl, are prescribed for pain management. As individuals increase their tolerance and develop a physical dependence on these drugs, many turn to a cheaper and more accessible alternative: heroin.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse reported that painkiller prescriptions tripled across the United States between 1991 and 2011, jumping from 76 million to 219 million prescriptions. Shockingly, the Center of Disease Control (CDC) reported that 12 states had more opioid prescriptions than people in 2012. Eight of those 12 states were in the southeast: Alabama, Tennessee, West Virginia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and South Carolina.

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, individuals who become addicted to these prescription painkillers are 40 times more likely to develop an addiction to heroin. Similarly, four out of five heroin users previously abused prescription painkillers.

As addiction to painkillers became more widespread, the Southeastern US also saw an influx of white powder heroin from South American drug cartels, making heroin easier to acquire and cheaper than prescription medication. As a result, the CDC has reported a steady rise in heroin use across the US since 2000 with a sharp rise after 2010, and age-adjusted rates for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin tripled between 2000 and 2013 in the South.

In the face of rising rates of heroin addiction and fatal overdose throughout the Southeast, there is a great need for organizations that support individuals in overcoming their addiction before it is too late. The Owl’s Nest, based in Florence, South Carolina, is one addiction recovery program that has been successfully responding to that need for 15 years.

Residents first enter the Intensive Program, a 28 to 42 day program that is designed to meet each resident’s specific recovery needs. In this stage, residents are given the opportunity to recover from addiction in a safe and structured environment with as little distraction as possible. Book studies, group discussions, a sponsor relationship, and 12-step workshops guide residents as they relearn basic skills for life and relationships.

Daniel McAlister, Men’s Director at The Owl’s Nest explains, “The Intensive Program residents benefit greatly from our small group setting. The structure allows for more one-on-one time with our staff and alumni, and our teachers are able to answer questions and foster discussion during the workshops.” The staff at The Owl’s Nest meets frequently with residents of the Intensive Program to assess progress and address evolving needs as they move throughout the stages of recovery. This personalized support ensures residents are well-equipped to lead a happy, sober life upon graduating from the program.

Upon completing the Intensive Program, residents can choose to enter an Extended Program, where they are trained in basic vocational skills and encouraged to gain employment as they prepare to re-enter society. Finally, the Transitional Program provides residents with ongoing accountability and drug screenings as they navigate new freedoms including a cell phone, person vehicle, and the ability to come and go more freely. The ongoing support and accountability provided to residents of The Owl’s Nest is crucial to their success. The organization has seen great success among its graduates and has ongoing relationships with thousands of alumni across the country who are living lives of freedom and ongoing sobriety.

If you’d like to partner with The Owl’s Nest to support recovering addicts throughout the southeast, or if you have a loved one struggling with an addiction, please contact The Owl’s Nest today at (888) 779-6893.

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